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How to Hire a General Contractor by RESTORE Construction

The routine for hiring a general contractor is not radically different from that of hiring a designer. You want to hire someone with proven skills, somebody you can work with, and someone with a sound business sense for schedules and managing personnel. If your architect is supervising your construction, he handles the hiring of the general contractor for you.

Always hire a contractor that has an established business that can be verified by reviews and has a presence online.  Almost all businesses have reviews on Yelp and other websites offering customer feedback.  You can also check the local building department for the permits a contractor has used in the past.  If a contractor tells you he performs his work where permits are not needed, run away as fast as you can.  This is a big red flag that the contractor is more than likely not legitimate and you will not have any recourse if problems arise in the future.

If you are on your own and you don’t know where to begin, ask for recommendations from friends or acquaintances who have had home construction done. Personal references are always best. Personal to you, that is, not to the contractor—sometimes people refer a favorite nephew or the son of a friend out of regard for their relationship rather than a knowledge of the person’s skills or qualifications. You will probably do best hiring a local contractor with an established business and reputation.

If the referrer has had work done by the contractor, ask for an assessment of the work. Did the contractor finish at or near the budgeted price? If not, were the change orders reasonable? Was the work completed on schedule? Did the contrac­tor willingly return to correct problems? Would they use him again? Are they happy with the finished product?

Another source of contractors is your local lumber yard. Not houseware stores where nails are sold by the dozen, but real building supply houses where con­tractors do their bulk business. The proprietors of such places know who the reliable contractors are. They know which contractors pay their bills on time, whose orders are always confused, and which ones are always returning merchandise.

Meeting the Contractor
Once you’ve identified candidates, you will need to meet and talk with each of them. The contractor will need to see the plans and will want to examine the structure to be remodeled. Only after looking at the exist­ing home or apartment and reviewing the changes to be made can an estimate be prepared.

Checking References
When you meet them, ask each GC for four or five local references. That’s a perfectly reasonable request, and no reputable contractor should hesitate to provide them. Getting the names and numbers, however, is only the beginning, next, you need to make a few calls.

Telephone the previous clients, identify yourself as a homeowner in the market for building services, and ask the key questions: Did the GC in question finish the job on time? Is the completed job satisfactory? How much did the price change along the way? Were the workers neat or did they leave a hopeless mess behind? If possible, ask if you might be able to take a first-hand look at the work, too. Only by inspecting it yourself can you judge the caliber and acceptability of a contractor’s work. You may get additional insights into the contractor from talking with the clients in person, too. Lessons previous customers learned may be helpful to you.

Call the local Better Business Bureau and ask if there are any complaints on file against the contractor(s) you are thinking of hiring. A call to the local building department inquiring about their professionalism and courtesy may be revealing. Ask each contractor who his primary supplier of materials is, and then call that sup­plier.

A quick call to a local credit bureau is also a good idea. Ask how long the company has been in business. If you uncover any pending suits or liens, walk away. You don’t need the problems that can occur when a contractor is in litigation, like the sheriff arriving to impound the contractor’s tools—or your building supplies. It happens.

Other sources for references are banks and subcontractors. Ask the GC who he has dealt with and call them, too. The banks can tell you about his fiduciary responsibility and the subcontractors about how well organized he is.

Another word of caution: Treat your contractors, subs, and the other people you hire with appropriate respect. They’re not your employees, they are business people from whom you are buying services. A modicum of courtesy and basic con­sideration will be rewarded. That goes for the men and women who work for them, too.

On the other hand, resist the temptation to get too friendly with any of your contractors. Keep your relationships strictly professional. They aren’t your friends: again, these are people with whom you have a business relationship. Invite them to dine with you after the job is done. A friendly but professional distance is appropriate until then.

We hope this helps in finding the appropriate contractor for your restore construction, restoration construction or new construction.

770-898-7064

Should you restore that historic home?

As you’ll find out, historic home ownership brings with it a unique set of questions, decisions, and goals. Let’s address one of the most basic questions first: Should you restore or rehabilitate your house?

Your decision will influence the house’s finished character, the project cost, and the amount of time it takes. It will also impact how much of the work you take on yourself and how much you’ll hand off to professionals.

With that said, here are 10 things to keep in mind when determining which approach will work best for you:

1. Identify the factors that will shape your decision. Deciding whether to restore or rehabilitate your house, and to what extent, involves understanding its history; its architecture; and the present condition of its materials, finishes, and systems. You should also consider your household’s lifestyle and what personal needs the finished house must accommodate. More broadly, local historic district designations, local building codes, property insurance, and other regulatory or financial considerations will impact the path you take.

2. Review the house’s history. Who lived in the house and when? Did important events occur there? Did either (or both) scenarios have historical significance? If so, you could consider restoring the house to that period to help interpret its history.

3. Know what “restore” means. To restore a house means to return its interior and exterior appearance to a particular date or time period. Strict restorations—ones that eliminate everything not present during the period chosen—are rare for homes, with most owners opting to maintain modern systems (plumbing, anyone?) and sympathetically designed changes, such as later additions, that add to the house’s history.

4. Know what “rehabilitate” means. To rehabilitate a house means to make it useful and functional for contemporary living while preserving important historic and architectural features. For example, a rehabilitated old house would always include modern electrical, mechanical, and plumbing systems, a modern kitchen, and other attributes typical of present-day homes.

5. Choose your approach. The major difference between restoring and rehabilitating is to either exactly duplicate a particular period or concentrate on preserving a sense of the changes that have occurred over time. For example, if an Italianate-style house had lost its wood eave brackets, a restoration project would duplicate them in wood as they originally appeared, while a rehab project would add new brackets of a compatible design in an appropriate substitute material (ex. fiberglass).

6. Evaluate existing alterations. Consider the quality, design, materials, and craftsmanship of the original house as well as the changes that have occurred over time. Compatible interior and exterior changes of the same or better quality than the original house, even if done in different styles or materials, should probably be kept and restored. Conversely, you should probably remove any poorly designed or executed changes.

7. Design new additions and alterations with attention to detail. When adding to or altering your home, consider its scale (apparent size), actual dimension, and massing (proportion/balance). Use materials, textures, and colors similar to those of the original building.

8. Integrate modern touches with care and caution. The key to a quality rehabilitation is how well it accommodates modern technologies and living styles. Keep changes non-intrusive and compatible with the house’s design and style, and don’t let alterations destroy or cover historically or architecturally significant features or materials.

9. Take care not to falsify the history of the house. This might seem counter-intuitive, but you actually do want to be able to tell additions apart from the original. That way, the house’s history is visible and transparent. Also be careful not to design additions that make the house appear to date from an earlier or later period, or alter the house’s details to an extent that suggest a different architectural period.

10. Look to the experts. For a more detailed list of recommendations, check out the (509) 294-4968. This jam-packed resource from the National Park Service includes guidelines on preserving, rehabilitating, restoring, and reconstructing historic buildings.

There’s no right or wrong answer when it comes to determining whether you should restore or rehabilitate your historic home. Let your property, capabilities, and needs help guide your decision, and chances are you’ll arrive at an accurate, appropriate solution.